‘Beyond the Woods’ – Halloween Song Challenge

On the 31st, we will be publishing a collaborative Halloween piece. Last week we asked some talented writers to come up with a Halloween themed poem (called ‘Beyond the Woods’, naturally)… Now we want to hear from the musicians!
Take a look through the poems, choose one that you feel particularly drawn to, and use those words to create a song!

  • Songs need to be sent over by midday on Friday 29th.
  • Submissions accepted in any form – (email/google drive/direct through IG, etc). YouTube links preferred!
  • These can be sent to lauren@beyondthewoods.co.uk, or through @btwfestival on socials.
  • All ages, skill levels, instruments, styles.
  • This can be either a solo or group project (everyone will be credited).
  • We will release our favourite(s) across our social media platforms, and all songs will be listed on the website. Please include any names and/or handles you’d like to be credited under.

We can’t wait to see what you come up with – have fun!

‘Beyond the Woods’ by Chris Pidsley (@chrispidsleymusic)

Beyond the woods is a space where I lay
Where the sun has no business and the grass fills the shade
My heart fits the silence where the birdsong should stay
Beyond the woods is beyond my way
Darker trees are lined ahead
The horizon bends above my bed
And I like to think that I’ve reached the edge
But beyond the woods is beyond instead
And time will find a reason
And the nights will find the day
When it’s loose and out of season
I’ll take a walk beyond the woods and fade away

‘Beyond the Woods’ by Maddie Magdalene (@maddiemagdalenemusic)

Beyond the woods and far away,
You’ll find the creatures who sleep all day,
Don’t get too close, don’t let them hear you,
They’re dreaming of fame, they’re dreaming of music,
Don’t interrupt the dreams of the musos,
They’ll steal and kill your soul with sharp claws tugging on your heartstrings,
Don’t disturb the musings of the musos,
They’ll cut open your brain and view your flaws as sustenance for new things

‘Beyond the Woods’ by Daniel Etherton (@detherton)

What lives in the woods was left to my imagination
But in the middle of the night without hesitation
I had grown tired of dreams, speculating beyond the trees
And set out to see what I could find on Halloween
Passing shrubs, leaves, dirt tracks and Autumnal leaves
Guided by dim moonlight. I nearly had a fright
There was a commotion, crashing, like waves hit rocks in the ocean
A party with a few skeletons, werewolves; witches necking back potions
As my body froze, I shrieked out “hello!”
Only to be welcomed in, as if it was my own home
There were cups of tea, food to eat and a ghost playing the keys
I hopped on the mic and gave the best performance of my life
It started getting early – the night turned to morning
So we all parted ways because nobody could stay
A lesson learnt to be intrigued by the unknown,
Stay safe, be curious and go out exploring

‘Beyond the Woods’ by Lisa February (@lisfebruary)

i’ve lived with the lights off
too long to admit

so long, that memories
of sunshine people
or summer skies
feel like stories
my brain playing
twisted little tricks

i didn’t choose to come here
nobody would

but life before
became obscured
i went to sleep in my bed
and woke up

in the woods.

for months
i’ve walked barefoot

across woodland, wasteland, cemetery
the cold, warped arms of long-dead trees
outstretched, as if reaching up
grasping, desperate for something

form a tomb-shaped canopy
block out the world above
entrap me

in solitude
in empty
in wishing i remembered
what it meant to be free

what it meant to be more
than a hollowed-out body

to have more than
spiders and maggots for friendship
better company than skeletons
free from their closets

to salvage my purpose
my reason to fight
to light up a spark
and take back my life

to remember who I am
and to feel how i should
to find a path home
go back

beyond the woods

Beyond The Woods Meets: Rebekah Fitch

Rebekah Fitch is an Irish alternative singer and songwriter. Her most recent songs have been released alongside some totally unique extras – a short film, a tapestry, and an entire game! We caught up with her to ask where her inspiration comes from…

What made you decide to do these? How did you come up with the ideas?

Haha, well like all of the best ideas, the overall vision of doing a visual EP came to my crazy mind while I was trying to fall asleep one night. I realised that one of the things I love most about what I do is the creativity and the collaboration that’s available, working with talented people that I love to make art that I’m really passionate about. I’ve always wanted to assemble a team around what I do, bringing in the creative strengths of other amazing people I admire to make projects that go beyond the music. So I tried to make a visual parallel for each song, one that was unique to the meaning behind the song and allowed it to flourish into something that would further develop everything it contained. I just love when artists expand their music into a wider creative world, and so I wanted to challenge myself creatively to do that.

How has the pandemic impacted your creativity? Did it give you time to work on things or just generally slow everything down?

Hmm, it’s been a mixed bag I think – very challenging. For me, when gigs weren’t able to go ahead, I had to find a multitude of new jobs and ways to survive, so time to be creative was very limited. It’s felt like being on pause for 18 months, just when I had moved to London, ready to take on the world! But I’m just so grateful that I’m still getting to make music at the moment, even if it’s at a slower pace. I’m learning to be patient with it and not blame myself for any lack of progress. What’s the rush?

What are you most looking forward to as the world slowly gets back to normality?

I’m a very social person, so being able to hang out with friends again was just such a blessing, for my mental health, for my day-to-day happiness… Career-wise, I just can’t wait to get back in the motion of it all – the writing, the recording, the visuals, the gigging – feeling like there’s a sense of growth and movement, riding the wave of it all. That gets me excited.

If you could collaborate with any other artist, who would you choose?

Oooh…  So difficult to pick just one! It would have to be someone who I really admire, am influenced by, and I think is ahead of the curve creatively, but different enough from my own style that the fusion we would make would blow people’s minds. Maybe Childish Gambino, or James Blake??

What have you been up to lately?

So recently I’ve been planning a UK and Ireland Tour for the end of October/start of November, which I am SO pumped for! It feels amazing to be working towards something tangible, especially something that you can share with other people in a magical moment. I’m heading to Birmingham, Newcastle, Manchester and Dublin, and the Belfast and London with my band!

What’s your proudest moment/achievement as an artist?

I would say my headline show in The MAC Theatre in Belfast is still my proudest moment. It was my biggest headline show, and completely self-organised and self-promoted. We sold out all 350-seats, and we had full band, a string ensemble (which I wrote the arrangements for) and a light show! I couldn’t believe it all came together, it was just electric, and I felt so supported.

What’s the last song you listened to?

Well Lorde’s album came out today, so all of that on repeat!

What’s a controversial opinion you hold?

Love Island is the worst invention known to man!

What’s your favourite foreign word?

Omg what an excellent question! I’m a big fan of those videos where they find all the words that sound the same in one language, and form a whole sentence with them. For example, “the green worm goes towards the green glass,” in French is “le ver vert va vers le verre vert”. Genius. Need to fit it into a song somehow.

Beyond the Woods Meets: Bull

Bull – in our humble opinion, ones to watch. The band recently announced they will be playing BBC Introducing at Reading and Leeds, not to mention their upcoming tour (they’ll be in Lincoln on October 22nd!). Have a read through their interview and get yourself up to speed before it all kicks off!

Where does the name Bull come from?

We think it was our friend Liam’s suggestion. I think we went with it partly because we knew we wanted one word, (like Yuck!) but also because it seemed to sort of match with our philosophy as a band. (Bull sh*t). I had been in a lot of bands before but never as the songwriter. I wanted to be in a band where it wasn’t stressful and we were doing it purely for fun, no rules!

How did you all meet?

When we first formed in 2011, we were all at school together. I met Dan as I am the boyfriend of his sister, Martha. And we would have a lot of fun playing music together and I showed him a few chords on guitar. One of his best buds Rory came over to my house and we enjoyed playing music together, then we figured we needed a drummer and my old primary school friend Louis had been seen wearing a pixies t-shirt at school (and I’d heard him drum) so that was Bull mk1. Kai went to school with Dan and us and joined the band on megaphone for a laugh a few times. He had also played bass in York for a long time and was a good friend of ours so a great fit to join on bass. Tom Gabbatiss we’d known through gigging and I went travelling with him and asked him to join the band then. And the rest is pop history.

What are the best (and worst!) things about being in a band?

Good question! I’m sure the answer (at least to worst) might be slightly different for each of us. But I’m sure best is generally the feeling of playing music, when we’re all playing together and on the same page. But yeah we all also like travelling and making friends and meeting people. It’s really nice revisiting places and feeling like your meeting back up with old friends, picking up where you left off type of stuff. Worst… financial instability. That’s not great. But I wouldn’t change it 🙂

What have you been up to lately?

We’ve released our album so we’ve mostly been working on the next one (actually two!) and preparing to tour our album (Discover Effortless Living) for the first time this September/October. We’re playing all over the Uk and returning to the Netherlands which should be great 🙂

If your music was a person, what would they be like?

Hmmm, like a mixture of the four of us I suppose. Dan’s hair, my eyes, Kai’s ears, Tom G’s lips.

What has been your most memorable gig so far (and why)?

There have been a lot. Remember a good one in Groningen in the Netherlands at a place called Vera. We were supporting Canshaker Pi. Was just one of my favourite times I can remember playing, the sound was amazing, that venue is very inspiring.

If you could collaborate with any other artist, living or dead, who would you choose?

Willem Smit (from Personal Trainer / Canshaker Pi / Steve French in the Netherlands). 

What are your hopes/goals for the future of the band?

I’d like if we could record more albums, tour. I’d like it very very much if we could play at venues like Vera and The Brudenell Social Club and The Fulford Arms, and people would want to come out and see us play.

Upcoming Gigs


Midlight

5th October 2021
Paper Dress Vintage, London

We’ve teamed up with our mates Club The Mammoth for our first show in the capital! Tell your southern mates!

Buy tickets for Midlight


Maddie Magdalene (plus Lucy May Walker and Jaz Beeson)

6th October 2021
The Waiting Room, London

Another London gig, this time with an incredible all-female line up!

Buy tickets for Maddie (18+)


Bull (plus: Indigo Bay, Current Climate, Serial Chiller, and Hannah Fletcher – BBC Introducing DJ set)

22nd October 2021
The Scene, Lincoln

Huge acclaim after their debut album release this year, once you see them at the festival you’ll be coming back for more!

Get tickets for Bull (18+)


The Rills

16th December 2021
The Platform (above The Engine Shed), Lincoln

We’ve already had to upgrade this show due to huge demand. Don’t miss this homecoming show from these indie upstarts!

Buy tickets for The Rills (14+)


Only Sun plus Tin Pigeons and Jaz Beeson

Rescheduled date tba
Akedo Gaming Bar, Lincoln

Buy tickets for Only Sun (18+)


Festival Olympics

Following the opening of Tokyo 2020 (only a year late), we’ve compiled a list of everyday festival occurrences that we feel are just as demanding as Olympic events. So if you’re feeling rough and nursing a hangover after Latitude festival? Nonsense, you’re basically an Olympic athlete. 

400m sprint 

That mad dash you do from one stage to another when someone has unhelpfully scheduled both of your favourite acts to overlap. The current world record is 43.3 seconds, held by Wayde van Niekerk, who was desperately trying to catch both Tame Impala and The 1975 at the 2016 Glastonbury festival.
(…just kidding, it was the Rio Olympics). 

Swimming

The exact same journey between stages – but after the rain has hit. Regular Olympians don’t even have the additional hurdles of tent pegs and the odd welly boot, so who’s really putting in the most effort here?

Wrestling

Who would you rather take on: one Olympic medalist, or an entire festival crowd? Always take a second to appreciate your achievements when you manage to wrestle your way through a particularly tight crowd. That takes a lot of determination, willpower, and every muscle in your body – you’re a born wrestler!

Weightlifting

This is really just getting all your stuff to the festival in the first place. You’ve just arrived – now begins the trek to the campsite. You’ve got a four-man tent, plus all of the stuff you’ve packed for the next few days, not to mention the extra things that your friend just couldn’t possibly fit in her own bag. You grab some drinks on the way, precariously balancing bags on your forearms so you can take a sip. Each time you raise that cup to your mouth is equivalent to some record-breaking weightlifting efforts (okay, it’s not, but it feels like it). 

(Crowd)Surfing and (Stage)Diving

Who needs water or a surfboard when you’ve got a crowd of people willing to carry a stranger over their heads? 

Basketball 

This is a fun one, best done with friends, and arguably one of the most important parts of a festival – responsibly slam-dunking your rubbish in the bin instead of ditching it all on the field. You don’t win medals for being lazy and inconsiderate. 

Artistic Gymnastics

Don’t underestimate yourself – you know full well that those dance moves are nothing short of gold medal Artistic Gymnastics! Grab yourself a hula hoop or a pair of batons and you’ve covered Rhythmic Gymnastics too. 

Hurdles 

Trying to find your way to a toilet in the middle of the night, while leaping over tent strings, rubbish, and the occasional person who didn’t quite make it back to their tent before falling asleep (10 points to Gryffindor for outstanding moral fibre if you stop the race to help them out).

and finally:

Football

Nothing clever here, just actual football. Maybe with an empty beer can or some balled up socks.

Statement on the cancellation of Beyond The Woods 2021

Dear Friends,

It is with very heavy hearts that we have to inform you that, following the postponement of the 21st June easing of lockdown restrictions, Beyond The Woods Festival will no longer be taking place this year.

To say that we are gutted is a huge understatement. Over the last seven years our organising committee have poured their hearts and souls into Beyond The Woods. People have given up hundreds of hours of their time to get the event to where it is, and for them not to be able to enjoy seeing their hard work come to fruition is an enormous disappointment.

After the disappointment of having to postpone the festival in previous years, our team were desperate to put on a show for you in August. However, after recent events it has become apparent that this will no longer be possible.

The uncertainty around lockdown being lifted, the lack of availability of insurance cover for Covid-related festival cancellations, and a lack of clear guidance on which measures might be required of mass gatherings such as ours means we’ve been left with no option other than to call off this year’s event.

The situation with Covid has been anything but predictable. Without any certainty, either in the form of insurance, or a cast-iron guarantee that the festival would be able to take place restriction-free, we’re not going to be able to proceed as we’d so dearly wanted to. 

Over the coming weeks, we’d have to pay tens of thousands of pounds in upfront costs to ensure that Beyond The Woods would be able to take place, covering everything from marketing to marquee hire, but with no guarantee that the festival would be able to go ahead in August – without any additional restrictions.

Beyond The Woods began life as a birthday party in our back garden in Lincoln. While the bands have got bigger in recent years, and the organisation more detailed, it’s still the same small group of friends and volunteers putting on the event. We’re not multi-millionaires, and there’s no big corporation backing the festival. We do this purely for the love of it.

We understand that many people will be as disappointed as we are, but we sincerely hope you can understand why we do not feel it’s possible to go ahead with this year’s event. The situation has now changed, and the risk for us as an organisation has just become too great.

We are working hard to secure a new date for 2022 and all tickets purchased for this or previous years will remain valid. You are of course welcome to a refund, and if your tickets were purchased from an official Beyond The Woods supplier, we will be in touch in the next couple of weeks to advise you of the refund process.

We’d like to say a big thank you to everyone for your support during this extraordinarily difficult period and we hope to see you all in 2022.

Love

The Beyond The Woods Team

The World’s Most Unique Music Festivals

Underwater Music Festival – Florida Keys

Quite a niche festival – obviously you have to be a pretty good scuba diver to attend, considering it takes place entirely underwater! Attendees are encouraged to dress up, and compete for prizes by playing sea-themed instruments – think bass-oon, trom-bonefish, obloefish. Underwater-themed music plays through speakers suspended under boats (Yellow Submarine, etc). ‘It’s not as clear, but you can still hear it and understand – it just has a little different tone to it’. The festival was set up to promote reef conservation, and a local radio station sponsors the event to promote environmental sustainability and responsible diving.

Air Guitar Championships – Oulu, Finland

Initially a joke, the air guitar championships in Finland now draw a huge crowd. Contestants ‘play’ two songs, which are scored out of six for each round. These performances must be air guitar only – strictly no air drums, air piano, air harp, etc. – and obviously no real instruments. The ideology behind the event is simple, realistic, and not-at-all dramatic: ‘wars would end and all the bad things would go away… you can’t hold a gun while you play air guitar’. Rob “The Marquis” Messel currently holds the title, previously held by Nanami “Seven Seas” Nagura:

24-Hour Drone Festival – Hudson, New York

This immersive festival features musicians working within the spectrum of drone, creating 24 hours of uninterrupted sound. Described as a experimental, communal and conceptual experience, participants set up camp on the floor of an old industrial factory and settle in to listen to 24 straight hours of ambient, atmospheric music. It is recommended that they lay on the floor ‘so that sound waves move horizontally across the body’. Thankfully, there’s also a 24 hour coffee bar, so they don’t sleep the experience away.

Snowbombing / Snowboxx – Mayrhofen, Austria / Avoriaz, France

These festivals have a similar USP – no prizes for guessing what. Both taking place on the pistes, they offer some fun, unique extras alongside the music. As if it wasn’t a cool enough experience to go to a festival in the snow, Snowbombing offers Alpine yoga, chairlift speed dating(?!), and a rave in an igloo. Snowboxx has purpose-built snowball fight arenas and bottomless brunch. Previous acts at Snowboxx include Gorillaz, Stormzy and Rudimental, while Snowbombing boasts performances from Example, The Vaccines and Tinie Tempah.

Les Dunes Electroniques – Ong Jmel, Tunisia

Sounds like a regular electronic festival, right? Wrong. Situated in the Sahara, Les Dunes Electroniques takes place in the abandonded film set which makes up Mos Espa – Anakin Skywalker’s childhood home. Once the festival starts, music plays for thirty hours straight. The ideal combination for anyone who loves both Star Wars and the Tunisian underground electronic music scene!

Fyre Festival – The Bahamas

Just kidding.
(If the Fyre Festival drama somehow passed you by, Netflix has a documentary – ‘FYRE: The Greatest Party That Never Happened’).

And finally…

Beyond The Woods – Stourton Woods, Lincolnshire, UK

The only festival on the list in the UK (so, definitely the one you should book tickets for – right now). It features some amazing acts, both national and local, including Alfie Templeman, The Staves, Vistas and Olivia Dean. There’s also a whole range of other entertainment – from yoga and deer safari to axe throwing and wood workshops.

Taking place from August 6th-8th, this is not one to miss! Get your Beyond the Woods tickets here: https://www.gigantic.com/beyond-the-woods-tickets/lincoln-stourton-estates/2020-08-07-13-00

Full line up announced!

The day we’ve been waiting for is here – we’re so excited to be able to finally reveal the full Beyond the Woods line up! We have so many incredible artists for you, from our headliners to some wonderfully talented local acts. Definitely not one to miss!

You can buy your tickets here – we look forward to seeing you soon!

The Staves

The Staves are an English indie folk trio of sisters Emily, Jessica and Camilla Staveley-Taylor, from Watford, Hertfordshire. The Staves began performing together at open-mic nights in Watford hosted by a local pub, The Horns. Originally performing as The Staveley-Taylors, the trio later changed their name to The Staves.

The Staves’ ‘Good Woman’ was written and recorded in a time of severe turmoil for the band, seeing the ending of relationships, the death of their beloved mother and the birth of Emily’s first child. Produced by John Congleton, the album stands as a testament to their strength and that of other women, to sisters, mothers and daughters. To love, loss and change. To trying to be a good woman.

Praise for Good Woman…
“their three-part blood harmonies form the shimmering centre of an elaborate, album-long soundscape” 8/10 – Uncut
“elegantly nuanced” **** – Mojo
“an album with attitude” – Sunday Times Culture
“pop-rock sophistication” – **** – The Times
“melodic sweetness is bolstered by a sense of urgency and stylistic cool” – **** – The Guardian
“a sophisticated return” – **** – NME

Alfie Templeman

Headlining our Friday night Good Karma Club Takeover, Alfie Templeman has been hotly tipped by just about everyone with a history of backing the next big thing!

Alfie Templeman

Alfie Templeman knows music. At just 17, this boy wunderkind already has four EPs to his name, and an encyclopaedic knowledge of music history that some veteran artists would envy. He’s been called a “bedroom producer”, and that’s true – all of his songs were crafted at home in the small village of Carlton, Bedfordshire. “It’s kind of boring,” Templeman says cheerfully. “I live in a nice place and everyone’s friendly and supportive, so I’m lucky. But there’s not a lot to do, so that’s one of the reasons I got into songwriting.” But where many young artists create tracks from pre-made samples, Templeman is more likely to pick up one of the 10 instruments he taught himself.

Follow Alfie on Instagram

It started with his father. A builder by trade but a passionate guitarist by nature, Templeman’s dad would fill the house with the sounds of classic rock, while his son banged away to the rhythm on pots and pans. Then one day, his dad brought him along to do some work at a friend’s house. That friend wasn’t sure how to entertain a child, so he put a video of a live Rush concert on the TV. “I was blown away,” Templeman recalls. “I can vividly remember watching Neil Peart play. He became my first musical hero.” He began saving his pocket money to buy “all of the Rush albums”, then set out converting a mate so they could form a band together. Aged eight, using his sister’s toy microphone and an old laptop, Templeman recorded his first demo.

At school, he always felt like the odd one out. “All the boys were playing football, and I hated that,” he says. “I felt like the weird kid because I didn’t want to do sports.” He began going to cello lessons, which he credits for his perfect pitch. Then he fell in love with the drums around the same time he was teaching himself to play one of his dad’s left-handed guitars (right-handed). After that it was the keyboard, mandolin, “a bit of violin”, bass, sitar, harmonica, synths… “One of the reasons I learnt all that was so I could play and produce everything myself,” he explains. “I had to have full control over my first EP. I just wanted to see if I could put everything together so it sounded good.”

It definitely worked. Like An Animal, released by Chess Club Records in 2018, is an astonishing, self-produced collection redolent of Kevin Parker and Mac De Marco. There are hazy, sun-drenched twangs of guitar; swooning, Eighties-style synths; moody, wandering basslines and warm percussion. Unlike many other artists, who might try to compensate for their youth by tackling the “big” subjects, Templeman makes no attempt to hide his age. These songs are about feeling like an outsider, exam stress, and those all-consuming first crushes.

Like An Animal was followed by two EPs in 2019, Sunday Morning Cereal and Don’t Go Wasting Time. The former was infused with heavy funk influences, from the squelchy bass and vocal fuzz of “Stop Thinking (About Me)” to the dreamy psychedelia of “Busy”. The seven-track Don’t Go Wasting Time was an ambitious leap that shone a brighter spotlight on Templeman’s extraordinary range, encompassing pop, indie, rock, Latin and prog influences. It’s all the more impressive upon learning that, around this time, Templeman ended up in hospital, where he was diagnosed with childhood lung disease.

“It doesn’t really bother me, but I’m one of those ‘vulnerable to Covid-19’ people, so I’ve been shielding since March,” he reveals. “It’s been a long summer!” Until the diagnosis, Templeman and his family thought he had bad asthma. You wouldn’t think he had any sort of condition to hear him – or, indeed, see him onstage. “It can get messy,” he laughs. His gigs, including a sold-out London show at COLOURS in Hoxton, are raucous affairs, filled by screaming fans only too happy to catch him whenever he hurls himself offstage. After a string of UK performances last year, including his triumphant Radio 1 Introducing Set at Reading and Leeds festival, he’s eager to get back to it.

And why wouldn’t he be? 2020 has already seen the release of his best EP to date, the irrepressible Happiness in Liquid Form, which has achieved millions of streams – not to mention praise from the likes of The Guardian and NME. Templeman refers to the title track as “colourful sugary disco pop”, but there’s plenty more to love besides that. Writing with Justin Young of The Vaccines fame has instilled a new confidence in Templeman’s songwriting. You can hear it in the cheeky bounce of “My Best Friend” – which will remind listeners of Billie Eilish’s insouciant charm – and the infectious Caribbean sound on “Things I Thought Were Mine”.  

“I listen to everything!” Templeman says, explaining how he came to have such a broad range of references. This is a teenager who will just as happily discuss John McLaughlin and Miles Davis as he would The Weeknd and Harry Styles. “I think some people might consider me as ‘just’ an indie artist, but my music is a broad mix,” he continues. “There are modern influences, but also a lot of prog, classic jazz, funk… I like to play things that people don’t expect, that hit you right in the feels.”

He praises his label, Chess Club Records, for helping him to “come out of my shell a bit” and be the charming, exuberant and driven young man he is today. “I’ve definitely become more open,” he nods. “I didn’t always know how to talk to people before, and I could get pretty anxious. I’d get scared, but everyone’s really nice!” He’s eager to become one of the voices of a generation determined to change the world: “Everyone at my school was so intelligent and well-informed. Young people have more of a voice now than ever.”

Templeman now has his eye on 2021, with a brand-new collection of songs on the way – the superb Forever Isn’t Long Enough – that he describes as “the best representation of what I’m about”. “Each song is different but linked,” he says. The mini-album opens on the thrilling rhythms of “Shady” – produced by Tom McFarland from the Mercury Prize-shortlisted collective Jungle. From there, you’ll be hooked, whether to the strut of “Wait, I Lied” (with nods to Gnarls Barkley and Justin Timberlake), or the gleaming “To You”, which recalls the sound of The Weeknd’s chart-dominating 2019 album, After Hours.

“My mum kept wanting to hear what I was working on, but I can’t show anyone until a song’s finished,” Templeman laughs, thinking of the reaction his fans will have when they hear this new material. He wants to do as many shows as possible when he gets back on the road, performing to a fanbase that now stretches around the world. “I want those new experiences,” he says. “2021 is going to be massive.”

© Beyond The Woods Festival 2021